REVIEW: The Cure at BST

REVIEW: The Cure at BST

Last night, in London’s Hyde Park, The Cure performed under the sweltering summer sun almost 40 years since their first live show. The pioneers of Post Punk, Goth and Alternative Rock- the show for BST Festival was a notable, telling one. Speaking volumes on how far the band has come and how complicated their story, their sound, their appeal has been. ⠀

This partly because it was one of the hottest days of the year so far: picture the Goths who pioneered the sun-shy subculture playing a two hour set under a rising 30 degree heat. Partly because of their yes-two-hour-twenty-minute set list that meandered between every hit, era and phase. Perhaps it was the crowd itself- a hot, heady ratio of Goths clad in black leather and lace; joyous football fans in their white tees and rainbow-garbed Pride partygoers coming together for the greater love of The Cure. What a stunningly poetic picture of British culture, don’t you think? From Easy Cure to The Cure- the feeling is that they have finally embraced their sound, complexity and identity, to the utter delight of their varied, far reaching audience.⠀

The Cure’s history reads like a long list of break-ups and make-ups, with frontman Robert Smith being the only principal member and songwriter. Forming in Crawley by schoolfriends, they were first Malice in 1976, then Easy Cure in 1977, and finally The Cure in 1978. The long list of ex-members comes down to evolving disputes on creative direction- but because of this their catalogue is one of the most diverse and enduring of any British band out there. ⠀
For those unfamiliar with the band, the question of how a band known for being sombre and morose boasts upbeat hits like ‘Love Cats’ has always been confusing. But it only takes one to put their expectations of who The Cure are to one side to find something that truly resonates with you. Something that strikes the right cord of emotion for where you are in your life now. And the beauty of which, is that it could change and evolve throughout your life too. Their catalogue beautifully mirrors the phases, joys and dispairs we all live through in life.
Which surely rings true for the band itself, and why yesterday seemed like such a marker for The Cure. Like most of their listeners, from the football fans to the Goths, they have stopped caring about who they are and who they will be in order to start enjoy being The Cure.
Find the time today to browse the music of The Cure in order to find the soundtrack to your relative reality right now. Look to celebrate the number evolving and complex people we can take on in one lifetime. ​